Fix My Practice - Blog

Fix My Practice – Are You Keeping the Right Business Records?

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

 Every business, regardless of its size, needs a system for retaining important records. Records are vital for tax filing, legal compliance and planning.

  • Why is record keeping important? Preserving records on employees, patients, sales, inventory, contracts, insurance and other aspects of your practice will help you track vital information about your business, file taxes in a timely and accurate manner, stay compliant with regulatory agencies and plan for the future. Your records will also be useful if your business is audited or involved in any type of litigation.
  • Which records should I keep? There are a wide range of records your business should retain; some are required by law while others help your business function more efficiently.
    • Original copies of any permits or licenses
    • Articles of Organization, Incorporation, DBA or other state business registration forms
    • Sales records
    • Expense records
    • Customer records
    • Tax returns, bills and statements
    • Inventory
    • Payroll and Personnel information (including but not limited to)
      • Job descriptions
      • Hiring documentation
      • Employee evaluations and performance records
      • Time sheets
      • Withholdings
      • Benefit information
      • Workers’ Compensation documents
      • 1099 documents for contractors
    • Insurance policies
    • Original signed copies of any contracts, agreements and leases
    • Patent, copyright or trademark documents
    • Depending on your business, there may be other records that you should retain.
    • Consult with your LegalShield provider law firm if you have questions.
  • How long should I retain records? The IRS, state tax authorities, regulatory agencies and contract terms may stipulate retention schedules for specific types of documentation. Develop a written retention policy that includes a schedule for keeping various types of records, as well as policies for safe and secure document disposal.
  • Do I need to keep my own personal financial records? It is vital, particularly for small business owners, to keep accurate personal financial records. LLCs and corporations, must keep a barrier between personal and business accounts. If a business is audited and it is found that this barrier was not properly maintained, personal records may be subject to scrutiny. In addition, small business loan applications often require the business owner’s personal financial records.
  • Should I hire a professional to help me manage my record keeping? This depends largely on your resources and the complexity of your records. In some cases, such as payroll and accounting, it may make sense to employ a payroll service or accountant to manage your filings and record keeping. Payroll record keeping requirements and tax filings can be extremely burdensome for small business owners. Using a contractor will save you the trouble of keeping up with changes in the law and dealing with a substantial amount of paperwork.
  • What if I can’t afford to hire a professional? Find a solution that fits your budget. There are many different options for accounting and document management software in a wide range of prices. No matter what system you select for record keeping, it is important to begin using it as soon as possible. Waiting to begin sorting your records will leave you with a disorganized mess that will grow more difficult to manage each day.
  • Can I store all of my business records on a computer? In some cases, such as signed and executed contracts and lease agreements, you should retain original paper documents. Most documents can and should be stored electronically. Even if you are required to retain a hard copy, having a digital file will serve as a backup. Electronic filing systems require far less space to store data and make filing, organizing and searching for documents much easier. If you store documents electronically, make sure you complete a daily offsite or online backup of your records. Cloud storage offers a combination of secure offsite storage and accessibility. If you need assistance, speak with an IT professional.

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that provider’s face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to and has helped healthcare providers across the country with new practice startups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

 

Fix My Practice – 8 Tips for Managing a Difficult Employee

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

Without a formal HR department, many small practice owners and managers put off dealing with challenging employees. No matter how small your practice is, it is important to set formal policies, properly document job performance and follow any applicable regulations. Failing to properly document and deal with a problem employee could damage morale and your bottom line

  1. Set clear expectations with an employee handbook. A carefully written HR handbook will clearly define expectations for all employees and managers. An employee handbook will also help protect your business from litigation. Your handbook should outline everything from benefits, time away from work, harassment, non-discrimination policies, performance evaluations and workers’ compensation. Provide each employee with a copy of the handbook and have him or her sign a document stating that it was received.
  2. Create a personnel file for every employee.  Each file should contain the employee’s resume, job description, signed policy documents and any other documents related directly to job performance. A personnel file should not contain personal details such as medical information, financial history, social security number, race, gender, nationality, sexual orientation or any other personal information not directly related to job performance. Personal information should be kept in a separate file not to be used in evaluating an employee’s performance.
  3. Schedule regular performance reviews for all employees. It is important to set a standard performance baseline for all employees. Focusing only on problem employees will make your actions seem arbitrary rather than purposeful. Evaluations allow you to set realistic goals for improvement and growth.
  4. Be proactive in Addressing specific concerns when they arise.  It is vital to discuss matters when they happen instead of waiting for a review. Waiting may make the issue seem trivial or may catch the employee off guard. Use the annual review to address how the employee has responded to any issues that came up during the course of the year.
  5. Document your concerns in the employee’s personnel file. If you discuss a concern with an employee make a note in their file. Many companies hold off on terminating employees because they do not have any documentation. Any significant discussion of job performance or violation of company policy should be noted in the employee’s file.
  6. Provide feedback and set concrete goals for improvement. Avoid taking punitive action to correct a concern. Do not badmouth the employee around the office or talk to them in an unprofessional manner. Set specific goals and put them in writing for the employee to sign and acknowledge. If an employee fails to meet the goals you have set then you can take further action.
  7. Clearly define consequences for failure to improve or to take corrective action. Failing to define what will happen if the employee does not improve provides little incentive for improvement. If an employee will be terminated for not meeting specific goals, make sure they understand that is the consequence.
  8. When necessary do not hesitate to terminate an employee. Firing an employee is one of the most difficult jobs a business owner or manager can face, but sometimes there is no alternative. If an employee violates specific company policies involving harassment or customer privacy or if they steal or commit any other action that jeopardizes your clients, business or another employee’s safety, document what happened and take immediate action. If you are concerned the employee may become confrontational ask another owner or manager to sit in on the termination meeting.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

#iamMsSos #practicemanagementconsulting #practicemanagement #physicianconsulting #medicalconsulting

Have you heard about “Virtual” credit cards (VCCs)?

Fix My Practice – Have You Heard about “Virtual” Credit Cards (VCC)?

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

“Virtual” credit cards are an emerging method for health plans and third-party payment vendors to issue payments to physician practices for patient services. VCCs are 16-digit credit card numbers, most commonly faxed or emailed to the practice by the plan or vendor. The practice is expected to run the number through its credit card terminal as it would for charges associated with patient payment of copays and deductibles. The practice is responsible for paying all interchange fees, typically ranging from 2% to 5% of the total amount of the charge for these “card not present” transactions.

Payments made via VCC do not meet the requirements for the Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) mandate included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), as they are not considered “electronic” payments under the law. In addition, the EFT transaction is designed to correlate with the Electronic Remittance Advice (ERA) and facilitate reassociation of the payment with the remittance. VCCs do not offer the practice the ability to automatically reassociate the VCC payment with the ERA. Those providers adopting EFT can accelerate claim payments while reducing staff time spent processing VCCs or paper checks.

Accepting credit cards from patients, in addition to the convenience factor, shifts the patient debt collection responsibilities to credit card companies, thereby eliminating potential bad debt risk for the practice. For that service, the practice is willing to accept the associated fees. There is not the same advantage with VCCs, and plans and vendors issue them to save them the cost of printing and mailing paper checks. Payment delays and requirements to submit additional EFT enrollment paperwork can also be used by plans as a disincentive for the practice to reject VCCs.

Many practices have been forced to accept VCCs or encounter significant barriers in trying to move away from this form of payment to EFT. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently issued guidance in an effort to accelerate adoption of EFT and discourage the use of VCCs. The agency stipulated that:

  • Health plans sending VCCs must stop if a provider requests to receive payments via EFT;
  • Health plans and third-party payment vendors must not to charge fees for the use of EFT and costs are limited to banking transaction fees (maximum of $.034 per transaction);
  • Health plans cannot deduct funds from a provider’s account unless contractually authorized by the provider; and
  • Practices are not required to contract for additional “value added” payment services from third-party payment vendors.

Action steps for practices:

  • The agency encourages providers to lodge a formal complaint against any payer refusing to support EFT, ERA or requiring providers accept VCCs.
  • Determine which of your plans and vendors are sending you payments via VCCs (or charging you EFT fees)
  • If you receive an unwanted VCC, do not process the payment. Contact the plan or vendor and immediately request all payments via EFT
  • Remember that payers MUST send you EFT if you request!
  • Refuse to sign any plan or vendor contract that requires the practice to accept VCCs (or EFT fees)
  • Talk to your financial institution about any fees they apply
  • Stand firm against VCCs, EFT fees
  • Lodge a formal complaint directly with CMS

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

#iamMsSos #practicemanagementconsulting #practicemanagement #physicianconsulting #medicalconsulting

 

Fix My Practice – 10 Key Points of a Well-Managed Practice January 24, 2018

10 Key Points of a Well-Managed Practice

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

I often get asked by physicians what are some of the key things for me to know to determine if my practice is being well-managed? There are many, but here are 10 basics which are not in order of priority.

  1. The practice has foundation documents appropriate to the corporate structure and written agreements describing how income and expenses are shared by physicians and/or other providers and how partners enter and exit the practice. The owners of the practice and management meet monthly.
  2. The practice has documents that set the guidelines for operations such as a compliance plan, disaster plan, personnel handbook, job descriptions and requirements for annual evaluations, raises, bonuses and progressive discipline. Management and staff meet monthly.
  3. The net collection percentage is 90% or more. This means that of the expected collectible dollars, 90% is collected.
  4. The practice has a budget and variances are addressed.
  5. The unfilled appointment percentage is 5% or less. This is in retrospect, so it includes no-shows. The practice has a marketing budget and a written marketing plan.
  6. The practice has a line of credit or other means to draw upon in the case of unexpected cash flow drop.
  7. A single commercial payer comprises no more than 50% of the practice business.
  8. Employee turnover rate is 10% or less. New employees are brought onboard with training, coaching and competency testing.
  9. The practice has the ability to produce management reports to track and trend production, payments, adjustments, and denials. Process Improvement is used to address negative trends.
  10. Patient satisfaction is prioritized and measured, and improvement is valued.

How well did you rank with these?  If you didn’t meet them all what processes will you be putting in place moving forward?

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that provider’s face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to and has helped healthcare providers across the country with new practice startups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

#iamMsSOS #FixMyPractice #practicemanagementconsulting #practicemanagement #physicianconsulting #medicalconsulting

Fix My Practice – Why You Should Welcome a Patient Complaint January 17,2018

Why You Should Welcome a Patient Complaint

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

No one is ever excited to hear patient complaints. When I worked in a practice daily I absolutely dreaded when a patient wanted to speak to me because I knew 9 times out of 10 it was a complaint and I felt more times than not that I had little to offer a patient who was upset or frustration with something that had happened, not to mention, in the business of the practice I most likely had been interrupted from another pressing task that I really needed to get back to.

Today as a consultant working with a client on practice management, I can’t wait to hear patients’ complaints. Complaints are the only opportunity managers have to understand the patient’s experience and hear in their own words what went wrong for them. By listening carefully, you have the potential to deliver customer satisfaction around the following areas:

  • You can gain insight into an experience in the practice and dissect it to see why the problem occurred and what can be done to fix it.
  • You can model to the staff how essential patient objections are and how genuinely you take them.
  • You can retain the patient for the practice, and hopefully make them a fan who will recommend your practice to their friends and family.

In the past, it may have taken a series of events for a patient to complain to the manager or to the doctor, because many patients will not risk disenfranchising a physician they really like. Today is the advent of the consumerist patient, and people are feeling empowered to complain about problems in healthcare (this is a good thing!) Practice managers should step up to the plate to meet them and make sincere attempts to cultivate a positive patient experience from beginning to end. In addition to active listening here are suggestions for delivering a positive patient experience following a complaint:

  • Train staff to prioritize all patient calls with complaints to you. Unless you are in the middle of a meeting, take all patient calls as they come in. If you cannot take the call, ask the staff to make sure to document the best time to return the call and the best number to call back. Make sure you then prioritize returning the call.
  • Listen to the patient until they finish talking and then repeat the complaint and ask questions to make sure you understand what happened
  • Let them know that their experience is not what you want for patients.
  • Tell the patient you will investigate the complaint and give them a definite date and time when you will call them back with a follow up report.
  • Talk to all staff and physicians involved in the incident. Call the patient back and share any information that is appropriate. Most patients will be satisfied to receive a call back and hear that their complaint has been discussed and/or addressed.
  • If possible offer your direct number to patients and invite them to call you if they have any further problems and have them ask for you when they come in for their next appointment, so you can meet them.

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that provider’s face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to and has helped healthcare providers across the country with new practice start ups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

#iamMsSos #practicemanagementconsulting #practicemanagement #physicianconsulting

Fix My Practice – Is Internal Conflict Costing Your Practice? January 10, 2018

Is Internal Conflict Costing Your Practice?

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

Conflict is nothing more than two people disagreeing about something (genuine or shallow) and that disagreement being emotionally felt by at least one of the parties. Conflicts and clashes exist in every workplace and a medical practice is no exemption. There are times when our clients call with because they have been experiencing some sort of a conflict among staff. From a business standpoint, addressing conflict and dysfunctional interactive dynamics is just as relevant as having a healthy bottom line and efforts directed toward revenue cycle management and overhead control.  Due to the interdependent environment of a medical practice, effectively dealing with dysfunction in one area enhances profitability and productivity.

While opportunities to understand significant cost savings in healthcare are fading, dealing with unresolved conflict is an area where nearly every practice can still benefit from a review. Unresolved conflict represents the biggest reducible cost in organizations no matter how you look at it.

My experience is that even when longstanding unresolved conflict is acknowledged and openly discussed within a practice, leadership and physicians may still fail to take appropriate action when needed. Physicians and managers often admit that they are not comfortable dealing with emotionally charged situations or that they feel awkward, not knowing exactly what to say. Others say they fear they will make the situation(s) worse by making a bigger problem. Another common response I hear is “I’m not a babysitter, get me some adults to work in here. I have my own real work to do”.  It is at this point that I help them understand how addressing these types of issues are also their responsibility, and that taking a hands-off approach is not an option. We then work on identifying their chronic patterns and recognizing the effects of conflict, beginning in its earliest stages.

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that provider’s face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to and has helped healthcare providers across the country with new practice startups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

#iamMsSOS #FixMyPractice #practicemanagementconsulting #practicemanagement #physicianconsulting #medicalconsulting

Fix My Practice Blog – 4 Steps to Make Your Practice Ready for New Medicare Cards – September 21, 2017

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

4 Steps to Make Your Practice Ready for New Medicare Cards

The new Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015 has laid down the rules to remove the Social Security Number (SSNs) from all the Medicare cards by April 2019. According to the new regulation Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI) will be replacing the SSN number, all the transactions like eligibility status, billing and claim status could be monitored using the single number.

Here are 4 steps to prepare for new Medicare cards

  1. Go to the provider website of Medicare and sign-up for MLC connects. This will provide you with insights about the new cards and its future impacts.
  2. Verify the Medicare patient address; if they differ ask your patients to contact the social security and update their Medicare records.
  3. Create awareness about new Medicare cards, by sending out mailers to the patients associated with your practice. Displaying signs in the practice to create awareness.
  4. Health care providers can update their system with new MBI number and inform the staff to make an effective use of MBI numbers.

Why new Medicare card so important?

By replacing the current SSN based healthcare cards, Medicare is looking to protect the medical records of people. The purpose of MBI number is protection of both healthcare and financial information; promote the federal healthcare benefits and service payments. The MBI number would be protected as personal identifiable information.  The new Medicare cards will be mailed at the beginning of April 2018 with MBI numbers.

Transition Period

In 2016, 17.6 million Americans were Medicare beneficiaries, so Medicare plans a steady and slow transition period. For transition period, you can use either HICN or MBI; the transition period will begin during the time period from April 1, 2018 and end on December 31, 2019. During the transition period, there is an active monitoring to make wide-spread adoption so Medicare operation is uninterrupted. The transition period ends on January1, 2020 and only few exceptions can be allowed either in HICN or MBI.

Medicare exceptions:

Appeals: You can use either an MBI or HICIN for appealing.

Adjustments: You can use HICN for Drug Data Processing, Risk Adjustment Processing and encounter data.

Reports: Quality Reporting, Provider Statistical, Accountable Care organizations and for many other reports which are submitted to the Medicare.

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that provider’s face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to and has helped healthcare providers across the country with new practice startups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

 

Fix My Practice Blog – Is the Utilization of Copy and Paste in EHR/EMR a Risk? – July 12, 2017

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

Is the Utilization of Copy and Paste in EHR/EMR a Risk?

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in collaboration with ECRI conducted a study titled Examining the Copy and Paste Function in the Use of Electronic Health Records.

This report describes the findings obtained from a usability study of the ‘copy and paste’ functionality in EHRs. ‘Copy and paste’ functionality is intended to allow medical practitioners to easily and efficiently reuse information in patient EHRs without having to retype the information. However, in practice, current implementation of this functionality has introduced overwhelming and unintended safety-related issues into the clinical environment.

Major findings resulting from a Human Factors assessment derived from data obtained from this study of the copy and paste function are identified as follows:

Length of information: Unconstrained ability to extract a substantial amount of information utilizing copy and paste can present users with convoluted and/or impertinent information impairing situation vigilance. Users may miss consequential pieces of information.

Attribution of information: Clinicians need to know the source of the copied and pasted information, who copied and pasted it, what was added to/edited in the information and the date and time the information was copied and pasted.

Wrong information: A common error in the use of copy and paste is that users forget to properly review and edit all of the information they have copied and pasted (frequent interruptions in the clinical environment being one of the major causes of this error) and users are not provided with system features that promote efficient editing.

The 64-page report is authored by Svetlana Z. Lowry and provides specific recommendations for user interface design to ensure safety-related usability for the copy and paste function.

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that provider’s face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to and has helped healthcare providers across the country with new practice startups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

Fix My Practice – 3 Tips for Patient Portal Engagement – June 28, 2017

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

3 Tips for Patient Portal Engagement

Two-thirds of the practices that participated in the 2017 Physicians Practice Technology Survey said that getting patients to sign up and use patient portals consistently is a challenge. Is this the case for your practice, if so, try these 3 simple tips to help get your patients more involved in the process?

Within these 3 things make sure you market and/or talk about the benefits, not just the features and get the staff involved in that process, for instance:

  • Have staff members from the front to the checkout promote the patient portal throughout the patient’s visit. Every staff member should have a script to talk up the patient portal to patients, and is ready to list benefits items that is available in the portal.
    • For instance, a front office staff member might ask how did you make your appointment, and then let the patient know they can request appointment via the portal and even receive appointment reminders by email.
    • When patients are checking out, staff and tell the patient they’ll be able to pay their bills online if there is a balance after the insurance.
    • When someone calls for Rx refill, the Medical Assistant may tell them about the benefits of requesting this via the patient portal.
  • Use every patient handout, paperwork or marketing collateral to promote the patient portal.
    • Add a line to bills letting patients know they can pay online using the portal and include a note on patient education flyers that they can access more helpful information in their portal.
  • In promoting the use, offer incentives that the staff also promote to the patients during their visit and those incentives include entering their name into a monthly prize drawing if they schedule an appointment online or do a Rx refill request.

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that provider’s face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to and has helped healthcare providers across the country with new practice startups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group | www.ppsosgroup.com

Fix My Practice – Massive Cyber Attack Affecting Healthcare Organizations – May 22, 2017

The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group® www.ppsosgroup.com

Massive Cyber Attack Affecting Healthcare Organizations

You may have heard about the massive cyber attack that happened on Friday May 12th, involving a ransomware known as WannaCry, Windows systems and many healthcare organizations were affected by this attack and many more are still vulnerable.

You may have heard about the massive cyber attack that happened on Friday May 12th, involving a ransomware known as WannaCry, Windows systems and many healthcare organizations were affected by this attack and many more are still vulnerable.

This cyber-attack that affected over 150 countries. Victims of the attack were told they could free their machines by paying the equivalent of US $300 in Bitcoin. The ransomware threatened to delete the files within 7 days if no payment is made.

The situation has been stabilized and the feared second wave of attacks has failed to happen, it was contained by Marcus Hutchins, also known as Malware Tech, who registered a domain name to track the virus, which then stopped it from spreading. Since the malware relied on making requests to domains and ransoming the system when the connection wasn’t made, registering the domain essentially stopped the ransomware from spreading further.

This sinkholing of the malware has stopped the rate of infection, though Hutchins warns that it may be only a temporary fix. The ransomware spreads through a vulnerability in the Server Message Block in Windows systems. The creators of WannaCrypt used a backdoor to create an entry in Windows systems.

Additionally, the malware was also spread through social engineering emails that tricked users to run the malware and activate the worm-spreading functionality. The malware itself was delivered in an infected Microsoft Word file that was sent in the email, it is very important that you make sure staff doesn’t click on links within an email.

Organizations that use Windows systems and have not yet patched the vulnerability are vulnerable to this attack. Over 230,000 computers in 150 countries were crippled worldwide an Healthcare organizations in particular were affected by this Ransomware.

WannaCrypt affects all Windows systems that haven’t been updated to the latest version, or haven’t had the vulnerability patched.  If you have a Windows system, update it as soon as possible. Very important to make sure you only access the Windows Updates via your tools function on internet explorer and not via a Google Search.

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that provider’s face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to and has helped healthcare providers across the country with new practice start ups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Practicing quality medicine while maintaining and managing the bottom line is a balancing act that providers face daily. The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group is committed to helping healthcare providers across the country with new practice startups, IRO needs, and providing practice management and compliance solutions. Call our office to discuss any needs you might have.

Regina Mixon Bates, CEO | The Physicians Practice S.O.S. Group |

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